massarrah:

Oldest Known Musical Notation from Mesopotamia
Although no lutes are preserved from the Old Babylonian period in Mesopotamia, this tablet records a notation system for the four-stringed lute. The notation records two ascending heptatonic scales (i.e., a scale with 7 pitches per octave, like the major scale) to be played on the lute, and tablet has headings labelled “intonation” and “incantation”. Aside from being the oldest known record of musical notation, the tablet attests to the use of frets whose tones were purposefully calculated and to the presence of a musical curriculum in education. (Source)
Old Babylonian, c. 2000-1600 BCE.
Schoyen Collection, MS 5105.

Cool.

massarrah:

Oldest Known Musical Notation from Mesopotamia

Although no lutes are preserved from the Old Babylonian period in Mesopotamia, this tablet records a notation system for the four-stringed lute. The notation records two ascending heptatonic scales (i.e., a scale with 7 pitches per octave, like the major scale) to be played on the lute, and tablet has headings labelled “intonation” and “incantation”. Aside from being the oldest known record of musical notation, the tablet attests to the use of frets whose tones were purposefully calculated and to the presence of a musical curriculum in education. (Source)

Old Babylonian, c. 2000-1600 BCE.

Schoyen Collection, MS 5105.

Cool.

(via guruwithin)

Rachmaninoff. Grey skies. Warm tea. The best.

Can’t I retire and just let this be my life?

Also why am I pouring so much money into grad school when I could be using it to take piano lessons again and become great? Stupid. Stupid.

barefoot-daydream:

⋅⋅⋆∙⊱✿⊰∙⋆⋅⋅

Happy peace day!

barefoot-daydream:

⋅⋅⋆∙⊱✿⊰∙⋆⋅⋅

Happy peace day!

Tags: peace

Happy peace day.

Happy peace day.

(Source: p-i-r-a-d-o)

Tags: peace

emmadot:

oh my goodness.

Come on!

(Source: brokenunderstars)

A-A-Ron

A-A-Ron

(Source: comedycentral, via emmadot)

"When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life."

John Lennon (via dissapolnted)

Always a great quote.

(Source: feellng, via guruwithin)

"Well, let me give an example. When I’m driving, I sometimes turn on the radio and I find very often that what I’m listening to is a discussion of sports. These are telephone conversations. People call in and have long and intricate discussions, and it’s plain that quite a high degree of thought and analysis is going into that. People know a tremendous amount. They know all sorts of complicated details and enter into far-reaching discussion about whether the coach made the right decision yesterday and so on. These are ordinary people, not professionals, who are applying their intelligence and analytic skills in these areas and accumulating quite a lot of knowledge and, for all I know, understanding. On the other hand, when I hear people talk about, say, international affairs or domestic problems, it’s at a level of superficiality that’s beyond belief."

— Noam Chomsky, on people and seeing sports as an important factor rather than world issues, in a interview with Alternet.org.  (via assangistan)

(Source: alternet.org, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

"I’m not sure what I’ll do, but— well, I want to go places and see people. I want my mind to grow. I want to live where things happen on a big scale."

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Ice Palace and Other Stories (via bookmania)